Watch out for Merge Interval with date range Index Seeks

In my last post, I found that DATEDIFF, DATEADD and the other date functions in SQL Server are not as datatype agnostic as the documentation would have you believe. Those functions would perform an implicit datatype conversion to either datetimeoffset or datetime (!), which would noticeably affect the CPU time of a query.

Well, today I was building a query on an indexed date range, and the execution plan contained a Merge Interval operator. Turns out, this operator brings a few unexpected surprises to your query performance. The good news is, it’s a relatively simple fix.

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DATEDIFF performs implicit conversions

As I was performance tuning a query, I found that a number of date calculation functions in SQL Server appear to be forcing a conversion of their date parameters to a specific datatype, adding computational work to a query that uses them. In programming terms, it seems that these functions do not have “overloads”, i.e. different code paths depending on the incoming datatype.

So let’s take a closer look at how this manifests itself.

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Computing the modulus from very large numbers

… and what of this all has to do with IBAN numbers.

The modulus is the remainder of a division of two integers*. Suppose you divide 12 by 4, the result is 3. But divide 11 by 4, and the result is 2.75. This could also be expressed by saying that 11/4 is 2 with a remainder of 3. Computing that 3 is the work of the modulo operator, which in T-SQL is represented by the % operator.

Let’s explore how to compute the modulus of large numbers in SQL Server, and how this is useful in the real world.

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T-SQL template parser

Just for the heck of it, I scratched together a template parser for T-SQL GitHub. The usage of this function is similar to the STRING_SPLIT() function, except instead of splitting a string by a delimiter character, we want to split a string according to a defined template.

SELECT *
FROM dbo.Template_Split(
    'Wingtip Toys (Bethel Acres, OK)',
    '% (%, %)'
);

… will generate the following output:

Notice how the “%” wildcard character denotes how the string is split. Unlike the fancy stuff you can do with regular expressions, T-SQL wildcards don’t allow you to define capture groups, so this function is unfortunately constrained to just using “%”. I hope it will still come in handy to someone out there.

That’s it, that’s the post. Enjoy!

Turn your list into human-readable intervals

If you’ve worked with reporting, you’ve probably come across the following problem. You have a list of values, say “A, B, C, D, K, L, M, N, R, S, T, U, Z” that you want to display in a more user-friendly, condensed manner, “A-D, K-N, R-U, Z”.

Today, we’re going to look at how you can accomplish this in T-SQL, and what this has to do with window functions and gaps and islands.

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About wildcards and data type precedence

Implicit conversions in SQL Server follow a specific, predictable order, called data type precedence. This means that if you compare or add/concatenate two values, a and b, with different data types, you can predict which one will be implicitly converted to the data type of the other one in order to be able to complete the operation.

I stumbled on an interesting exception to this rule the other day.

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Set up access to network shares from SQL Server

Using a local service account for your SQL Server service, your server won’t automatically have permissions to access to other network resources like UNC paths. Most commonly, this is needed to be able to perform backups directly to a network share.

Using a domain account as your SQL Server service account will allow the server to access a network share on the same domain, but if the network share is not on your domain, like an Azure File Share, you need a different solution.

There’s a relatively easy way to make all of this work, though.

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Optimizing a string split and search

We’re no strangers to doing things in T-SQL that would perhaps be more efficient in a procedural language. Love it or hate it, a T-SQL solution is easier in some situations, like my sp_ctrl3 procedure that I use as a drop-in replacement for the standard sp_help procedure to display object information in a way that simplifies copying and pasting.

One of the things that sp_ctrl3 does is plaintext database search. If you pass a string to the procedure that does not match an existing object, it’ll just perform a plaintext search of all SQL modules (procedure, views, triggers, etc) for that string. The search result includes line numbers for each result, so it needs to split each module into lines.

I’ve found that this takes a very long time to run in a database with large stored procedures, so here’s how I tuned it to run faster.

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How to add “created” and “updated” timestamps without triggers

You have a table that you want to add “created” and “updated” timestamp columns to, but you can’t update the application code to update those columns. In the bad old times, you had to write a trigger to do the hard work for you. Triggers introduce additional complexity and potentially even a performance impact.

So here’s a nicer way to do it, trigger-free.

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