sqlsunday.com downloads are now on GitHub!

Regular readers of my blog will know that I occasionally share some useful scripts on my Downloads page. And even though I update some of those scripts regularly when new versions of SQL Server come out, or if I run into a bug feature, there really hasn’t been a practical way for readers to subscribe to those updates or to contribute with good ideas.

I recently attended the annual PASS Summit conference in Seattle, and as part of my personal goal to try to learn new (and scary) things, I took a precon on working with Git.

So as of now, a bunch of downloads are available on GitHub (which is, really, a much better place to host scripts than a shared Dropbox link). You can download them as usual, and if you want, you can add your improvements and send me a pull request. I know I’ve received a ton of good ideas and suggestions over the years, but more often than not, I haven’t had the proper environment to test those changes in, or I just haven’t had the time to dig into my old code.

But now you can:

The SQL Server Calendar project

I’m the type of developer that invents wheels. Yes, every wheel I design is unique in its own way, and hand-crafted for a specific purpose. And so it has also been with calendar dimensions (typically when I do data warehousing work).

This got me thinking – why not design the mother of all calendar dimensions? One that includes every conceivable calendar and property that I and others could use and re-use. One that could save me a ton of coding, and lessen the burden of having to validate it each and every time?

And that’s how I got started designing my one calendar script to rule the all.

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Have you tried sp_ctrl3?

I frequently need to look up object definitions when I’m developing or query tuning. You could use Object Explorer in SSMS, but that takes a lot of time and clicking. Then there’s the Alt+F1 shortcut, which will trigger the sp_help stored procedure. That however, comes with a lot of annoying built-in limitations, so a few years ago I started building and maintaining a “better Alt+F1” of sorts.

I decided to call it “Ctrl+3“. But I suppose you could assign it to any keyboard shortcut you want.

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