Get the join cheat sheet!

Download and print this nifty little PDF with all of the INNER, LEFT, RIGHT, FULL and CROSS JOINs visualized! It’ll look great on your office wall or cubicle. Your coworkers and your interior decorator will love you for it.

How it works: For each join example, there are two tables, the left and the right table, shown as two columns. For the sake of simplicity, these tables are called “a” and “b” respectively in the code.

You’ll notice that the sheet uses a kind of pseudo-code when it comes to table names and column names.

Prioritizing rows in a union

I just remembered a pretty common data challenge the other day. Suppose you have a number of tables, all with similar information in them. You want to union their contents, but you need to prioritize them, so you want to choose all the rows from table A, then rows from table B that are not included in A, then rows from C that are not included in A or B, and so on.

This is a pretty common use case in data cleansing or data warehousing applications. There are a few different ways to go about this, some more obvious than others.

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Video: three SQL Server join operators in three minutes

In an attempt to try a different approach, here’s a three-minute video explanation of how the different physical join operators in SQL Server work and why you would choose one over the other.

More reading

I’ve written a few blog posts on join operators befores, so if this video wet your appetite, here’s some recommended reading:

I’d love to hear what you think of the short video format! Please leave feedback in the comments below or on Twitter.

Comparing nullable columns

Do you ever compare the values of a lot of columns in two tables? Sure you do. Like, for instance, in a cross update, when you need to figure out which rows you should actually update. But it gets worse if the columns are nullable. The fact that any value could potentially be NULL vastly complicates the comparison and might wreak havoc not only on your code but also on your query performance.

But there’s hope.

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Working with intervals

At one point or another, you’re going to come across intervals when working in SQL Server. You could say that an interval is where you don’t have a single value, but actually a range of values, commonly delimited within a start and an end value. This range could be a group of accounts, versions of dimension members (in an SCD) or date/time intervals.

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Basic reconciliation skills

You will often encounter situations where you have to reconcile two sets of data – are they the same, and if not, what differences are there? This can be because you re-wrote a piece of code and you want to verify that it still does the same job, or it can be a straight-forward comparison of two data sources. In this article, we’ll look through some useful methods and functions to compare data in SQL Server.

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